Author - cwilliams@meta-logix.net

Lost Cities of Southern Nevada Exhibit

The Lost City Museum presents: Lost Cities of Southern Nevada, a new museum exhibit on abandoned towns of Southern Nevada.

“Lost Cities of Southern Nevada,” is new museum exhibit on abandoned towns of Southern Nevada

A brand new exhibit at The Lost City Museum in Overton, “Lost Cities of Southern Nevada,” explores the frequent cycles of growth, decline, and sometimes rebirth of communities in Southern Nevada by looking at the history of four areas of Delamar Mountains, The Meadow Valley Wash, Moapa Valley, and Eldorado Canyon. Abandonment of the Lost City area by the ancestral Puebloans is shown to be part of the ongoing story of migration into and out of southern Nevada.

The exhibit features artifacts, photographs and printed materials and runs through 2016. “The images we have to share really show something you won’t see again. Their stories tell us so much about Nevada and how we became who we are,” said Jerrie Clarke, museum director.

The Lost City Museum actively engages people in understanding and celebrating Nevada’s natural and cultural heritage. One of seven museums managed by the Nevada Division of Museums and History, an agency of the Nevada Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs, it is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily at 721 S. Moapa Valley Blvd., Overton. Admission is $5, children 17 and younger and members enter free. Take Interstate 15 north to exit 93. Access is also available from Lake Mead National Recreation Area or the Valley of Fire State Park. For more information, call the museum at (702) 397-2193 or visit Facebook.

Moapa Valley Art Guild Featured at Lost City Museum

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 5, 2016

Moapa Valley Art Guild featured at Lost City Museum in May

The Lost City Museum presents the artwork of The Moapa Valley Art Guild in May, including watercolor, colored pencil, oil, acrylics, gourds, jewelry and table art made by area residents.

Art instructor Max Bunnell is featured. When he founded The Moapa Valley Art Guild in 1959, Bunnell wanted the local community to have original works of art hanging in their homes and to stimulate artistic interest in the local community. The Moapa Valley Art Guild now presents a number of exhibits and events during the year. It also holds fundraisers to finance art scholarships for high school students and the valley’s Pomegranate Festival, set for Nov. 4 -5.

The Lost City Museum actively engages people in understanding and celebrating Nevada’s natural and cultural heritage. One of seven museums managed by the Nevada Division of Museums and History, an agency of the Nevada Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs, it is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily at 721 S. Moapa Valley Blvd., Overton. Admission is $5, those ages 17 and younger or museum members enter free. Take Interstate 15 north to exit 93. Access is also available from Lake Mead National Recreation Area or the Valley of Fire State Park. For more information, call the museumat (702) 397-2193 or visit Facebook.

Virginia City: To Dance with the Devil

May 28th, 2016

2pm to 4 pm
Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas

Where else but in Virginia City could a penniless Irish miner in a few short years amass a fortune greater than any of America’s robber barons, simply by dint of hard work and intuition, and remain a humble, caring human being? Here as well Mark Twain discovered and honed his comic voice, and notorious badman Sam Brown was lined with lead, with a coroner’s jury concluding, “It served him right.” Here also Julia Bulette, a kindly harlot beloved of the city’s firemen, was the toast of a rowdy Fourth of July parade. In Virginia City mines, men plunged into the scalding, hazardous heart of the earth, tantamount to partnering with hell’s dread demon, so that they could enjoy five Shakespeare companies performing at once, food rivaling Delmonico’s in New York, and frocks ordered directly from Paris that could be worn in this barren, windswept middle of nowhere. Join author Nicholas Clapp as he discusses Virginia City’s twenty turbulent bonanza years—what a time it was!

This program is free with museum membership or paid general admission. Books will be available for purchase.

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