News & Events

news and events

NSM Calendar of Events

The Nevada State Museum, Carson City hosts a wide variety of simulating lectures, tours, and events to keep you fulfilled throughout the year. Admission is $8 for adults and free for ages 17 and under. Museum members enjoy all the lectures and events for free! Click here for the latest calendar so you don't miss a single opportunity to stay engaged with and involved in your state museum.

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Detail of mural by Dorothy Nylen of USS Nevada, BB 36, the topic of our March 24 lecture by Judge Chuck Weller. 

Lost Cities of Southern Nevada exhibit

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“Lost Cities of Southern Nevada,” is new museum exhibit on abandoned towns of Southern Nevada

A brand new exhibit at The Lost City Museum in Overton, “Lost Cities of Southern Nevada,” explores the frequent cycles of growth, decline, and sometimes rebirth of communities in Southern Nevada by looking at the history of four areas of Delamar Mountains, The Meadow Valley Wash, Moapa Valley, and Eldorado Canyon. Abandonment of the Lost City area by the ancestral Puebloans is shown to be part of the ongoing story of migration into and out of southern Nevada.

The exhibit features artifacts, photographs and printed materials and runs through 2016. “The images we have to share really show something you won’t see again. Their stories tell us so much about Nevada and how we became who we are,” said Jerrie Clarke, museum director.

 The Lost City Museum actively engages people in understanding and celebrating Nevada’s natural and cultural heritage. One of seven museums managed by the Nevada Division of Museums and History, an agency of the Nevada Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs, it is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily at 721 S. Moapa Valley Blvd., Overton. Admission is $5, children 17 and younger and members enter free. Take Interstate 15 north to exit 93. Access is also available from Lake Mead National Recreation Area or the Valley of Fire State Park. For more information, call the museum at (702) 397-2193 or visit Facebook.

Reno Divorcee Movie – Valentine’s Day

Reno Divorcee Movie—Valentine’s Day Event 

In honor of Reno's history as being the Divorcee Capitol, the Society celebrates Valentine's Day with a historic Divorcee Movie.

Movie – Peach-O-Reno, 1931 (63 minutes)

The basic plot of the movie is Wheeler and Woolsey play Wattles and Swift, a pair of Reno divorce attorneys whose practice is so successful that their clients have to take numbers to be served.

When the working day is over, Wattles & Swift convert their law offices into a nightclub, with the secretaries shedding their street clothes to don skimpy dancing outfits and the junior lawyers transforming into waiters. 

Donation From Community Volunteers Leaves Lasting Legacy At Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City

The four children of Jack and Margie Gibson have honored their parents’ decades-long service to the Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City, with a $40,000 donation that enabled the museum’s latest exhibition.

The Gibson Collection is 15 detailed, hand-crafted and one-of-a-kind model replicas of the original Virginia & Truckee locomotives and a McKeen motor car. The works were built by railfan George L. Richardson starting in 1957, over 16 years.

Richardson loaned the models to the Nevada State Museum in 1973, and they were a fixture there for nearly 20 years. The collection was moved to the Nevada State Railroad Museum after the Jacobson Interpretative Center opened in 1990. The models were never the property of the museum, until now. The Gibson family’s generous memorial will assure the important collection remains at the railroad museum.

Jack Gibson (1920-2014) was a printer with a life-long love of trains. He was a founding member of the Northern California Railroad Club, the Central Coast Railway Club, and the California-Nevada Railroad Historical Society. He was involved in the initiation of both the “Western Railroader” and the “Ferroequinologist” newsletters. His introduction to the Virginia & Truckee came on June 5, 1938, when the California-Nevada Railroad Historical Society conducted the first ever railfan excursion on that Nevada short line using its nostalgic equipment.

Jack and Margie (1922-2015) eloped on June 14, 1941, and married on the steps of the Washoe County Courthouse in Reno. They moved their family to Nevada in 1959, where he worked for the Fallon Eagle-Standard newspaper. Though Jack’s work took the family to Visalia, Calif., for several years, he finished his career at the Nevada Appeal, where he was the production manager from 1975 until his retirement in 1982.

In Nevada, the Gibsons were avid explorers of ghost towns and old mining camps and became enthusiastic volunteers at the Nevada State Museum. The Gibsons actively campaigned for the creation of the Nevada State Railroad Museum in the early 1980s, and they generously supported both museums financially. Margie regularly worked in both museum stores and coordinated various receptions and special events. Jack was frequently the engineer or fireman on locomotive No. 22, the Inyo, and he edited the Nevada State Museum newsletter. They were instrumental in initiating the annual Santa Train, and bringing the locomotive “Joe. Douglass.” back to Nevada. Governor Bob Miller proclaimed their 50th wedding anniversary as A Day in Honor of Margie & Jack Gibson as “Outstanding Humanitarians and Respected Volunteers.”

The Richardson models were purchased for the Nevada State Railroad Museum by Diane Uchytil, Suzan Oliver, Gail Simon, and Skip Gibson and donated in collaboration with the Friends of the Nevada Railroad Museum. The museum is at 2180 Carson St. For more information contact (775) 687-6953.

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C’mon Baby: Do the Locomotion

Original Story by Melissa Schorr of the Las Vegas Sun. September 21, 1998.

There are only three 19th century American Standard steam locomotives remaining in the world. One is housed in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C.Another is in the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento. The third sits in Dan Markoff's backyard.

“I wanted to keep a piece of Nevada history alive,” says Markoff, 50, a Las Vegas trial lawyer, former UNLV history major and Nevada native whose unique locomotive is the focus of a new documentary, “Eureka's Incredible Journey,” which airs at 8 tonight on KLVX Channel 10.

Markoff rescued the 123-year old Eureka & Palisade Railroad Locomotive No. 4 from the scrap heap in 1986, and has spent much of his free time and energy since then restoring it to its original condition.

Like this article? Read the full article on the Las Vegas Sun website by clicking here.

The Lost City Museum presents the Plein air paintings of Brad Holt

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                          Feb. 23, 2015

 

 

Brad Holt paintings featured in Lost City Museum exhibit in January

 

 

The Lost City Museum presents “What the Rocks Tell Us: Southern Utah Landscapes,” an exhibit by artist Brad Holt, featuring paintings created outdoors in southern Utah and Nevada, on display in January.

 

Holt grew up in Cedar City, Utah attended Cedar City High School and graduated from Southern Utah University. He spent his early summers working on his grandfather's ranch hauling hay and working with cattle.  At age 17 he joined the Utah Army National Guard and served for the next two decades.

 

Holt was later mentored by landscape painter Jimmie Jones, who taught him how to stretch a canvas and showed him how to lay out his palette. “Raw Umber and Ultramarine were the core of Jimmie's palette, and they remain the core of mine to this day. They allow a subtle interplay of temperature in the under painting,” Holt said.

  

Holt won first place in the Everett Ruess Plein Air competition in Escalante, Utah in 2006.  He twice received the Artist's Choice Award and was featured artist in 2012. He has been an artist participant in the Zion Plein Air Invitational since its inception.

 

The Lost City Museum actively engages people in understanding and celebrating Nevada’s natural and cultural heritage. One of seven museums managed by the Nevada Division of Museums and History, an agency of the Nevada Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs, it is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily at 721 S. Moapa Valley Blvd., Overton. Admission is $5, children 17 and younger and members enter free. Take Interstate 15 to exit 93. Access is also available from Lake Mead National Recreation Area or the Valley of Fire State Park. For more information, call the museum at (702) 397-2193 or visit Facebook.

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NSM Family Fun Saturday: Beastly Encounters and Coyote Stories

Families are invited to visit the Discovery Lab to learn what animals such as Black Bear, Mountain Lion, and Mule Deer eat and how they adapt to their environments; learn about the signs and scat they leave behind. Explore animal tracks in our classroom and design a card or bookmark using animal track stamps. Observe and touch animal pelts. We will share coyote stories and allow children to participate using animal puppets depicting coyote, rabbit, and other favorites.

Volunteers and staff will show an educational powerpoint presentation and be available to answer questions. Advanced registration is not required. Stay as long as you like, from 10 am – 3 pm, Saturday, January 9, 2016. 

Cost: $8 for adults; free for museum members and ages 17 and under.

Contact information: Deborah Stevenson: dstevenson@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, at ext. 237.

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Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: Sliding Bones of the Smith Creek Playa, Nevada, and their Similarity to Racing Rocks in Death Valley, California

Dr. Baumgardner observed five skeletal elements or bone groups resting at the ends of furrow-like trails inscribed in the playa surface. These trails, with their bones, appear similar to the phenomenon described as “racing” or “sailing rocks” that is best documented from Racetrack Playa in Death Valley, California. Recently favored explanations for such movement involve combinations of water, low temperature, microbial mats, and wind. These options and the significance of such movement by skeletal material will be discussed in this lecture which begins at 6:30 pm. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Contact Deborah Stevenson, Curator of Education: dstevenson@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, ext. 237. 
at ext. 237.