News / Events

Introduction to Nature Photography (taught by Sharon K. Schafer) at NSMLV

Introduction to Nature Photography at Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas by Sharon K. Schafer

Take your mind and your camera off auto and learn how to better capture nature with your camera. If you have always wanted to take better photographs of wildlife and were unsure how to achieve it, this beginner-friendly half-day workshop will help you capture the wildlife and nature images you have always wanted.

Learn the rules of composition and when to apply them. Learn the basics of your camera controls and how to use them effectively to achieve your best exposure. 

This workshop is a blend of classroom instruction at the Nevada State Museum, and field experience in the wild areas of the Springs Preserve trail system. 

Because of size restraints, attendees must RSVP in advance by emailing Crystal Van Dee at cvandee@nevadaculture.org or calling at 702-822-8751

Date:
Saturday
March 5, 2016
8 am to 12 pm

Age Limit: 
Participants must be at least 10 years old. 

Requirements: 
1. Digital Camera & camera manual
2. Memory Card
3. Ability to walk 1-2 mile on even ground
4. Make sure your camera batteries are charged.

Workshop Size: 
limited to 20 participants. 

This program is free with regular paid admission. 

Schafer is a wildlife artist/photographer dedicated to the creation of images that foster an understanding and appreciation of the beauty and diversity of wildlands and wildlife around the world.Visit www.SkydanceStudio.com for more information.

This project is funded, in part, by a grant from the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

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Museum offers opportunity for fun, friendships with tour guide training in February

Fun and friendships start at the Nevada State Museum’s volunteer tour guide training set for Feb. 16-17 and 23-24 in Carson City. Volunteers are needed now and invited to join the free event that includes lectures, enrichment activities and all materials. Volunteers train to give tours of Nevada State Museum and the State Capitol for school-aged children and adults.

Guides will learn about Nevada’s rich history and culture with programs on USS Nevada’s 100th birthday by Bob Nylen, curator of history; Dayton, by Laura Tennant and Jack Folmar; J.W. and Annie Davis, by Kathleen Clemence; and pre-historic sandals, by archaeologist Pat Barker. In week two, art and science are the focus with staff presentations on Nevada water and animals, and one on wetland birds by Alan Gubanich, education chair of the Lahontan Audubon Society.

Both new and experienced guides are encouraged to attend all four days of training, including two Tuesday potluck lunches. Advance registration is required.

“These volunteers make Nevada’s heritage interesting and lively for the thousands of visitors who come to our museum each year. They enrich the experience for us all and they have a terrific time too,” said Jim Barmore, museum director.

The museum is at 600 N. Carson St., in Carson City. For more information and registration, contact Deborah Stevenson at dstevenson@nevadaculture.org or (775) 687-4810 ext. 237.

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The Midcentury Las Vegas Stage: Acts that Built the Entertainment Capital of the World

You are invited to the opening reception for the new exhibit at the Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery titled “The Midcentury Las Vegas Stage: Acts that Built the Entertainment Capital of the World.”

The exhibition explores both legendary and obscure stage acts from the perspective of the archives at the Las Vegas News Bureau and the Nevada State Museum, Las Vegas. Rarely seen photographs combined with video footage and stage costume tell the distinctive story of Las Vegas' original hotel lounges and showrooms. 

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Thursday, February 18th, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Las Vegas City Hall Chamber Gallery
495 S. Main Street
Las Vegas, NV 89101

RSVP to Stacy Irvin, Curator of Education
sirvin@nevadaculture.org or 702-822-8735

NSM Calendar of Events

The Nevada State Museum, Carson City hosts a wide variety of simulating lectures, tours, and events to keep you fulfilled throughout the year. Admission is $8 for adults and free for ages 17 and under. Museum members enjoy all the lectures and events for free! Click here for the latest calendar so you don't miss a single opportunity to stay engaged with and involved in your state museum.

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Detail of mural by Dorothy Nylen of USS Nevada, BB 36, the topic of our March 24 lecture by Judge Chuck Weller. 

“Lost Cities of Southern Nevada” is new museum exhibit on abandoned towns of Southern Nevada

A brand new exhibit at The Lost City Museum in Overton, “Lost Cities of Southern Nevada,” explores the frequent cycles of growth, decline, and sometimes rebirth of communities in Southern Nevada by looking at the history of four areas of Delamar Mountains, The Meadow Valley Wash, Moapa Valley, and Eldorado Canyon. Abandonment of the Lost City area by the ancestral Puebloans is shown to be part of the ongoing story of migration into and out of southern Nevada. The exhibit features artifacts, photographs and printed materials and runs through 2016.

“The images we have to share really show something you won’t see again. Their stories tell us so much about Nevada and how we became who we are,” Jerrie Clarke, museum director, said.

The Lost City Museum actively engages people in understanding and celebrating Nevada’s natural and cultural heritage. One of seven museums managed by the Nevada Division of Museums and History, an agency of the Nevada Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs, it is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily at 721 S. Moapa Valley Blvd., Overton. Admission is $5, children 17 and younger and members enter free. Take Interstate 15 north to exit 93. Access is also available from Lake Mead National Recreation Area or the Valley of Fire State Park. For more information, call the museum at (702) 397-2193 or visit Facebook.

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Lost Cities of Southern Nevada exhibit

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“Lost Cities of Southern Nevada,” is new museum exhibit on abandoned towns of Southern Nevada

A brand new exhibit at The Lost City Museum in Overton, “Lost Cities of Southern Nevada,” explores the frequent cycles of growth, decline, and sometimes rebirth of communities in Southern Nevada by looking at the history of four areas of Delamar Mountains, The Meadow Valley Wash, Moapa Valley, and Eldorado Canyon. Abandonment of the Lost City area by the ancestral Puebloans is shown to be part of the ongoing story of migration into and out of southern Nevada.

The exhibit features artifacts, photographs and printed materials and runs through 2016. “The images we have to share really show something you won’t see again. Their stories tell us so much about Nevada and how we became who we are,” said Jerrie Clarke, museum director.

 The Lost City Museum actively engages people in understanding and celebrating Nevada’s natural and cultural heritage. One of seven museums managed by the Nevada Division of Museums and History, an agency of the Nevada Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs, it is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily at 721 S. Moapa Valley Blvd., Overton. Admission is $5, children 17 and younger and members enter free. Take Interstate 15 north to exit 93. Access is also available from Lake Mead National Recreation Area or the Valley of Fire State Park. For more information, call the museum at (702) 397-2193 or visit Facebook.

Reno Divorcee Movie – Valentine’s Day

Reno Divorcee Movie—Valentine’s Day Event 

In honor of Reno's history as being the Divorcee Capitol, the Society celebrates Valentine's Day with a historic Divorcee Movie.

Movie – Peach-O-Reno, 1931 (63 minutes)

The basic plot of the movie is Wheeler and Woolsey play Wattles and Swift, a pair of Reno divorce attorneys whose practice is so successful that their clients have to take numbers to be served.

When the working day is over, Wattles & Swift convert their law offices into a nightclub, with the secretaries shedding their street clothes to don skimpy dancing outfits and the junior lawyers transforming into waiters. 

Racing bones are topic of talk at Nevada State Museum Jan. 28

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The unique movement of bones across Nevada’s Smith Creek Valley Playa in 2013 prompted the discovery of a rare phenomenon that causes bones to sail.  Water, ice and wind factor into the explanations offered by George Baumgardner, curator of natural history for the Nevada State Museum, who will present his findings from 6:30 to 8 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 28, as part of the museum’s Frances Humphrey Lecture Series.

 

Baumgardner and co-author Brian S. Shaffer wrote of their findings in the “Western North American Naturalist,” documenting for the first time the movement of animal bones across the desert floor.  A similar action has been recorded at Death Valley’s Racetrack Playa, where rocks have left trails showing their travel.  The Nevada playa referenced is also near the site of land sailing competitions that draw tourists from around the globe.

 

Admission to the talk is free for museum members and ages 17 and younger. Adult admission is $8. For more information, contact Deborah Stevenson at dstevenson@nevadaculture.org or (775) 687-4810, ext. 237, museums.nevadaculture.org or Facebook. One of seven museums managed by the Nevada Division of Museums and History, an agency of the Nevada Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs, the Nevada State Museum, Carson City, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, at 600 N. Carson St., Carson City.

Donation From Community Volunteers Leaves Lasting Legacy At Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City

The four children of Jack and Margie Gibson have honored their parents’ decades-long service to the Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City, with a $40,000 donation that enabled the museum’s latest exhibition.

The Gibson Collection is 15 detailed, hand-crafted and one-of-a-kind model replicas of the original Virginia & Truckee locomotives and a McKeen motor car. The works were built by railfan George L. Richardson starting in 1957, over 16 years.

Richardson loaned the models to the Nevada State Museum in 1973, and they were a fixture there for nearly 20 years. The collection was moved to the Nevada State Railroad Museum after the Jacobson Interpretative Center opened in 1990. The models were never the property of the museum, until now. The Gibson family’s generous memorial will assure the important collection remains at the railroad museum.

Jack Gibson (1920-2014) was a printer with a life-long love of trains. He was a founding member of the Northern California Railroad Club, the Central Coast Railway Club, and the California-Nevada Railroad Historical Society. He was involved in the initiation of both the “Western Railroader” and the “Ferroequinologist” newsletters. His introduction to the Virginia & Truckee came on June 5, 1938, when the California-Nevada Railroad Historical Society conducted the first ever railfan excursion on that Nevada short line using its nostalgic equipment.

Jack and Margie (1922-2015) eloped on June 14, 1941, and married on the steps of the Washoe County Courthouse in Reno. They moved their family to Nevada in 1959, where he worked for the Fallon Eagle-Standard newspaper. Though Jack’s work took the family to Visalia, Calif., for several years, he finished his career at the Nevada Appeal, where he was the production manager from 1975 until his retirement in 1982.

In Nevada, the Gibsons were avid explorers of ghost towns and old mining camps and became enthusiastic volunteers at the Nevada State Museum. The Gibsons actively campaigned for the creation of the Nevada State Railroad Museum in the early 1980s, and they generously supported both museums financially. Margie regularly worked in both museum stores and coordinated various receptions and special events. Jack was frequently the engineer or fireman on locomotive No. 22, the Inyo, and he edited the Nevada State Museum newsletter. They were instrumental in initiating the annual Santa Train, and bringing the locomotive “Joe. Douglass.” back to Nevada. Governor Bob Miller proclaimed their 50th wedding anniversary as A Day in Honor of Margie & Jack Gibson as “Outstanding Humanitarians and Respected Volunteers.”

The Richardson models were purchased for the Nevada State Railroad Museum by Diane Uchytil, Suzan Oliver, Gail Simon, and Skip Gibson and donated in collaboration with the Friends of the Nevada Railroad Museum. The museum is at 2180 Carson St. For more information contact (775) 687-6953.

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C’mon Baby: Do the Locomotion

Original Story by Melissa Schorr of the Las Vegas Sun. September 21, 1998.

There are only three 19th century American Standard steam locomotives remaining in the world. One is housed in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C.Another is in the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento. The third sits in Dan Markoff's backyard.

“I wanted to keep a piece of Nevada history alive,” says Markoff, 50, a Las Vegas trial lawyer, former UNLV history major and Nevada native whose unique locomotive is the focus of a new documentary, “Eureka's Incredible Journey,” which airs at 8 tonight on KLVX Channel 10.

Markoff rescued the 123-year old Eureka & Palisade Railroad Locomotive No. 4 from the scrap heap in 1986, and has spent much of his free time and energy since then restoring it to its original condition.

Like this article? Read the full article on the Las Vegas Sun website by clicking here.